HTML5 + Google Street View = Music Video 2.0

The indie rock band from Toronto is no stranger to innovative and interesting music videos, their “Neon Bible” web music video was thoroughly amusing but its innovation is dwarfed by their latest release “We Used To Wait”.

The Arcade Fire

In this video, The Arcade Fire and Director Chris Milk create a holistically personalized music video  experience and they utilized HTML 5 technology to deliver it. The video starts by asking you to input your childhood home address after which it will pull images from Google Earth, and Google Street view and age them in order to incorporate them into their video giving the entire soundtrack a nostalgic feel. Midway through the video, the user is provided with the opportunity to write a postcard to the current resident of their childhood home bringing us full circle in our thoughts of how it felt to grow-up in our childhood home. There are also a few Easter eggs around the website as well.

Power of Annonymous: Wikileaks

One of the pillars of the internet’s success has been the anonymity of interactions. The ability to take on a secret identity and go forth saying things and doing deeds that won’t be tied to your real life identity was the stuff of comics, but with the internet, everyone could be a superhero. While this sense of anonymity is being consistently chipped at by companies like Facebook and Google, yet, it still exists on the web. Anonymity is still prominent on the web, and there is no better example of that than the site Wikileaks.com.

Ever since its debut in 2006, it has been the bastion of whistle blowers, and the group behind it, the Sunshine Press,  has been mostly shrouded in mystery. In December 2009, and due to funding issues, they had to suspend the website, close its wiki and limit the site’s functionality to only accepting submissions. But its Director, the eccentric Julian Assange, seems to have had just the right kind of expose to generate publicity for the site and guarantee that they would be able to secure the maximum amount of funding possible.

Wikileaks!

Wikileaks!

On April 3 2010, they released a video entitled “Collateral Damage” which caused quite the controversy for the US armed forces and incited Robert Gates to be driven into an unenviable corner. The video has been viewed more than 6.5 million times on Youtube alone, and certainly got wikileaks a good amount of exposure and hopefully made their fundraiser a success so that they would keep on doing what they do best: be the go-to guys for whistle-blowers around the world.

This is not the only notable leak for them, and they have a long history of breaking some of the most critical documents and stories since their inception. Here are some of their most notable leaks in the past:

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