The Guardian Ian Prior’s Twitter Whoopsy

Twitter is a very useful tool to spread breaking news, we have seen it time and time again used by people and organizations to announce their scoops. Usually, tweeps are the ones that decide what is worth spreading so they retweet what they like and ignore the pieces of news that doesn’t interest them.

The thing is that influential tweeps who spread the news are usually very passionate about their topic and don’t take it lightly when someone is promising them the moon and fails to deliver. And that’s exactly what the Guardian learned the tough way.

The paper’s sports editor, @ianprior created a buzz on January 27th by tweeting the following:

“Major – and boy do I mean it – football exclusive coming up on guardian.co.uk sometime around 5.30.” — see tweet

That created a storm of speculation as to what that news might be, and it rocketed the #GuardianExclusive tag into a trending topic.

Power of Annonymous: Wikileaks

One of the pillars of the internet’s success has been the anonymity of interactions. The ability to take on a secret identity and go forth saying things and doing deeds that won’t be tied to your real life identity was the stuff of comics, but with the internet, everyone could be a superhero. While this sense of anonymity is being consistently chipped at by companies like Facebook and Google, yet, it still exists on the web. Anonymity is still prominent on the web, and there is no better example of that than the site Wikileaks.com.

Ever since its debut in 2006, it has been the bastion of whistle blowers, and the group behind it, the Sunshine Press,  has been mostly shrouded in mystery. In December 2009, and due to funding issues, they had to suspend the website, close its wiki and limit the site’s functionality to only accepting submissions. But its Director, the eccentric Julian Assange, seems to have had just the right kind of expose to generate publicity for the site and guarantee that they would be able to secure the maximum amount of funding possible.

Wikileaks!

Wikileaks!

On April 3 2010, they released a video entitled “Collateral Damage” which caused quite the controversy for the US armed forces and incited Robert Gates to be driven into an unenviable corner. The video has been viewed more than 6.5 million times on Youtube alone, and certainly got wikileaks a good amount of exposure and hopefully made their fundraiser a success so that they would keep on doing what they do best: be the go-to guys for whistle-blowers around the world.

This is not the only notable leak for them, and they have a long history of breaking some of the most critical documents and stories since their inception. Here are some of their most notable leaks in the past:

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